Is it time we cancelled cancel culture?| Eva Wiseman

Some of those who have been cancelled seem to have developed an aura of glamour – and made a lot of money. We need to rethink this…

Man, I love being cancelled,” said Dave Chappelle to a crowd of 19,000, after his Netflix special saw a member of staff walk out in protest at the way they’d handled complaints for his jokes about trans people. Leaked internal financial data revealed that Netflix had spent more than $20m on each of Chappelle’s shows, a figure that goes some way towards persuading me that “cancel culture” could be one of the most profitable startups in living memory.

I read Chappelle’s quotes on my phone while waiting for a friend in central London, a place now frosty and faintly hysterical, standing outside what appeared to be a Monopoly theme park. Yes, just up from the closed-down Habitat is a new and gleaming theatre, where for approximately £60 you can play an immersive version of Monopoly. By Christmas this may be the only way for most people of us to enjoy the experience of buying a house in London – strolling round a massive board with colleagues who have fattened significantly since they last shared a workspace, slightly drunk on red cocktails, alternately yearning for home and sickening at the idea that this fun must end, and by midnight, confused completely by the concept of cash.

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